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Bursa

A long day trip from Istanbul, Bursa is a city that dates back to at least 200 BC. Once part of the Roman Empire, Bursa was the first major capital of the Ottoman Empire back in the 14th century. Today, it is Turkey’s 4th largest city and the center of the Turkish automotive industry, but links to its glorious past still abound, including burial sites of the empire’s two founding sultans. Ulu Cami (Great Mosque), built in the late 14th century, is considered one of the city’s top sights and a prime example of Ottoman architecture. Bursa is known as a green city because of its lovely parks. Visitors in need of a Turkish towel can shop to their heart’s content at Kapalı Çarşı, just one of Bursa’s popular bazaars.

Troy

Troy is a legendary city in what is now northwestern Turkey, made famous in Homer’s epic poem, the Iliad. According to Iliad, this is where the Trojan War took place. Troy was destroyed many times since it was founded around the 3rd millennium BC, with a new Troy being built over the top of the previous one. Digging is still going on today, giving travelers a rare opportunity to see the past uncovered. The site also contains a large wooden horse built as a playground for children, shops and a museum.

Gallipoli

Gallipoli is famous as one of the biggest disasters for the Allies in World War I. The battle at the Dardanelles lasted from April to December 1915, and ended with the defeat of the Allies by the Turks. The Gallipoli Peninsula offers many opportunities to learn more about this battle, including the Anzac Walk that covers 14 important sites on the Anzac battlefield. Another 22 sites on the peninsula offer a better understanding of this important land and sea battle. One such site is the Battle of Çanakkale’ that led to the founding of the Republic of Turkey a few years later. Thirty-one cemeteries where the fallen of both sides are buried offer another opportunity for visitors to reflect on the sacrifices made by that long ago generation.

Pamukkale

Pamukkale is one of Turkey’s incomparable natural wonder with the calcium cascade terraces of snow white stalactites and is known as 8th wonder of the World by Turkish people. Pamukkale & Hierapolis together are both recognized as UNESCO World Heritage Sites since 1988. They have all the conditions required for an ideal touristic resort. Pamukkale means “Cotton Castle” but had many different uncommon names in the past. Pamukkale is very well known with the entrancing beauty of its unique geological formation and also with its historical remains.

The white cotton-like terraces are mineral deposits which come from Cal Mountain’s rich spring waters and volcanic springs that were saved since thousand years. The water runs down the travertine and fill them up with water and there is a pool where you can have a chance to swim among the ancient Roman columns.

The ancient city of Hierapolis was located on the top of the white terraces and is about 2700 meters long and 160m high. It can be seen from the hills on the opposite side of the valley. It has 14000 year-old existence.

To keep the travertine white and to prevent crush and damage on them, in 1997 it was forbidden to walk on them and the water is allowed to reach the terraces periodically according to weekly watering schedule. But it is possible to walk on the south part of the travertine with naked foot.

Denizli is a rapidly growing industrial (especially textile) and touristic town with numerous beauties.

Being a fertile region, the city has always been a center of cradle of civilizations succeeding one another. Luvians, Phrygians, Persians, Greeks and Romans are counted among the early civilizations; the later ones include the Byzantines, Seljuk and the Ottomans.

Denizli’s popular site Pamukkale is a must-see natural thermal water source and a unique in the world with its calcareous white steps. The ancient sites Laodicea, Tripolis, Hierapolis, Colossae, Eumania, Heraklia Salbace, Tabae, Dionysopolis, Apollon Lermenos Temple, Sebatopolis, Anava, Trapezopolis, Attuda, and Apollonia Salbace are also inside the borders of Denizli city.

Ephesus

Europe’s most complete classical metropolis, Ephesus is an ancient site located in Aegean Turkey. By the 1st century BC, Ephesus was one of the largest cities in all of the Roman Empire, boasting one of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World, the Temple of Artemis. The ruins of Ephesus are well preserved and contained within a large archaeological site, making it one of Turkey’s most popular tourist attractions. Its attractions include the massive Theater, the Temple of Hadrian and the magnificent Celsus Library, a two-story structure that was built to house more than 12,000 scrolls.

Cappadocia

Situated in Central Anatolia, Cappadocia is best known for its fairytale landscape of unusual formations resembling chimneys, cones and pinnacles. Natural processes such as ancient volcanic eruptions and erosion have all sculpted these odd formations over the ages. Thousands of years ago, mankind added remarkable touches to the landscape by carving out houses, churches and underground cities from the soft rock. The Hittites were the first to chisel out underground tunnel complexes, seeking safety from invading Persians and Greeks. Much later Christians sought refuge in Cappadocia’s tunnels and caves. Today, some of the caves in the region are actually hotels and cater to tourists.